2050 Long-Term Vision for Nigeria

2050 Long-Term Vision for Nigeria

Executive Summary

Nigeria, as one of the signatories to the Paris Agreement (PA), recognises that the transition to low-emission development is indispensable for achieving sustainable economic growth through pathways that yield reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and other social, economic, and environmental benefits.
In addition to the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) that outline climate actions until 2030, the Paris Agreement, under Article 4.19, calls for all Parties to strive to formulate and communicate LT-LEDS, considering common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities, in the light of different national circumstances.
To this end, the Federal Government of Nigeria decided to develop its LT-LEDS as part of her onus to ensure a low-carbon future, with an initial focus on a Long-Term Vision to 2050 for the country. The vision provides a clear sense of direction to all stakeholders for a well-managed transition to a low-carbon economy that grows existing and new sectors, creating new jobs and economic opportunities for the nation.
The vision states that: By 2050, Nigeria is a country of low-carbon, climate-resilient, high- growth circular economy that reduces its current level of emissions by 50%, moving towards having net-zero emissions across all sectors of its development in a gender-responsive manner.
It is hoped that this vision will promote sustainable development and guarantee a climate-proofed economic development through multi-stakeholder engagement, especially as Nigeria is also engaged in developing Medium-Term (2021-2025) and Long-Term (Agenda 2050) national development plans. It is also expected to lay a solid foundation for Nigeria to contribute to the global objective of climate neutrality, and to be a climate-resilient society with a knowledge-driven economy that is globally competitive and compliant with Africa’s Agenda 2063, as well as enable the country to play its leadership role in Africa effectively.
The Federal Government of Nigeria will now build on this initial long-term vision to develop a full long-term strategy.

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National Climate change Policy

National Climate change Policy

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Introduction

Scientific evidences are conclusive that the earth is warming and climates are changing with serious and potentially damaging consequences. Climate change is aggravating the environmental issues such as deforestation and land degradation, freshwater shortage, food security and air and water pollution. Projected increases in extreme climatic events as well as more changes in the weather patterns may further threaten the means of livelihoods in the face of inaction.
In Nigeria, the agriculture and food security, water resources, public health, and settlements sectors are particularly vulnerable to climate change. Most vulnerable regions are coastal regions and erosion and desertification-prone areas in the southeastern and northern parts of the country respectively. While everyone is vulnerable, the most vulnerable groups are farmers, fisherfolks, the elderly, women, children and poor people living in urban areas.
Responding to climate change falls into two broad classes of action, mitigation and adaptation. Mitigation refers to measures that may either reduce the increase in greenhouse emissions (abatement) or increase terrestrial storage of carbon (sequestration). Adaptation refers to all the responses that may be used to reduce vulnerability.1
Nigeria has taken the challenge of climate change seriously. The First National Communication was produced in November, 2003. A stakeholders’ initiation workshop on the Second National Communication (SNC) took place in December 2009, and is being finalized and a National Adaptation Strategy and Action Plan (NASPA) has been concluded. Nigeria now has a Climate Change Department (CCD) in the Federal Ministry of Environment in Abuja, Nigeria. The CCD is created to implement the Climate Convention and protocol activities. It also coordinates the activities of the Inter-ministerial Committee on Climate Change.
Nigeria already has several policies and strategic initiatives which if properly implemented, can serve as adaptive as well as mitigative climate change measures. Many of the initiatives in these policies (e.g. oases rehabilitation in the National Action to Combat Desertification and the National Policy on Drought and Desertification) can be taken as anticipatory adaptation measures and plans, which can be fine-tuned into policy options for climate change response in the country. This comprehensive policy and response strategy will enable these policies to translate into meaningful inter-sectoral activities for sustainable environmental management.

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IMPERATIVES OF CASSAVA PRICE STABILIZATION MECHANISM

IMPERATIVES OF CASSAVA PRICE STABILIZATION MECHANISM

Strategic Context

Africa accounts for approximately 64% (192 million MT) of the world’s cassava production, with Nigeria taking the lead with a production of over 59 million MT in 2019 representing approximately 21% of global production.
Nigeria’s average yield of 8.2 tons per hectare is very low compared to global best practices of 33.8 tons per hectare.
About 90% of Nigeria’s cassava production is grown by smallholder farmers who cultivate an average of just one hectare of cassava farm.

Limitations of The Current Price Regime In Cassava Value Chain

In Nigeria, the price of Cassava, particularly the fresh roots are highly unstable because the bulk of the product is harvested to service the inelastic food markets in the country.

 

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CAP-F Policy Brief Nigerian National Quality Council

CAP-F Policy Brief Nigerian National Quality Council

EMPOWERING THE NATIONAL QUALITY COUNCIL TO BUILD TRUST FOR NIGERIA’S TRADE

BACKGROUND

Safety standards are a critical component of agricultural products exports. To this degree, they serve as either barriers or catalysts for domestic and international trade in produce. For Nigeria, safety standards have been more of a barrier than a catalyst. Without a robust infrastructure, countries and territories are crowded out of the opportunities provided by globalisation and trade policies like Africa Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA).

In 2015, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) banned Nigeria’s dried Beans export as it contained between 0.3mg per kg and 4.6mg per kg of Dichlorvos pesticide. To put this in context, the 1 maximum acceptable residue limit is 0.01mg per kg. This has come at significant cost to the country, as it is reported to lose $362.5m annually in export income from the ban. According to an official of the Nigerian Investment Promotion Commission (NIPC), 30 percent of Nigerian exports were rejected due to poor branding, labelling and packaging. This shows the weight of the challenge of maintaining a healthy trust for trade through a robust national quality policy.

 

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CAP-F FACT SHEET: STIMULATING INVESTMENTS IN THE MAIZE VALUE CHAIN

CAP-F FACT SHEET: STIMULATING INVESTMENTS IN THE MAIZE VALUE CHAIN

STRATEGIC CONTEXT

According to the IITA, Maize is the most important cereal crop in sub-Saharan Africa, offering a diet staple for more than 300 million people. It accounts for 30-50% of low-income household expenditure in Africa and over 30% of calorie intake in the continent comes from maize.

MAIZE SUPPLY AND DEMAND IN NIGERIA

According to PwC, Nigeria is Africa’s second largest maize producer and the 14th largest producer globally. Citing the FAO, PwC notes that 11 million metric tonnes were harvested from over 6.8 million hectares of land, a growth rate of 49% from a decade earlier, and cites data from farmers’ association, which puts the production level at 20 million metric tonnes annually. Borno, Niger, Plateau, Katsina, Gombe, Bauchi, Kogi, Kaduna, Oyo and Taraba states account for 64% of the maize production in Nigeria.
According to BusinessDay, poultry feed production takes up about 60% of Nigeria’s maize consumption, 25% going into food and beverage industrial activity and the remaining 15% goes to household consumption.

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